Youth Education: Ndee’s Story

Youth Education: Ndee’s Story

Youth Education: Ndee’s Story

Youth education is a core pillar of 100 Humanitarians International, and Ndee’s story is a reminder of what is possible when girls are rescued in Kenya. At a very young age, Ndee was married to a man who already had several wives. After getting pregnant and having the baby, she ran from the marriage.

We were told her story, and agreed to help her family with a cow and goat to start. After we met Ndee, we agreed to sponsor her education in Secondary School. Her mom agreed to help raise her baby. She was facing a big challenge, but she got into a boarding school and was able to start school a couple of months later.

Lemarti Performs at Ndee’s Home

Ndee got a big surprise when Lemarti performed at her house the first time our team met her. She’s a pretty shy and quiet girl, so to have a big team and several musicians come to her home was pretty incredible. Over the years, Ndee has joined us on expeditions, where she has learned skills from our team. We have been able to visit her at her school. She had the opportunity to do an internship with Anita, learning how to sew, raise chickens, and build garden towers. 

Her life is completely different, and she has opportunities she never imagined now. She is getting ready to graduate from high school in 2020, with a goal to go on to University and become a surgeon. It’s been a long and difficult road for her, but she has stuck with it and is one of our best students. 

In June 2017, we were able to go and visit Ndee at her school. She was excited to see us. This was the first time we were able to visit her at school, when she was a Freshman. It’s amazing how far she has come since then.

Our team built garden boxes at Ndee’s house that trip, to help with providing vegetables for her family. Her parents got involved with helping build, and several members of the community joined in to learn.

100 Humanitarians International would love your help to provide school fees for students like Ndee. We have 27 students that we are supporting right now, and 6 of them are getting ready to graduate. If you would like to help, just donate below, or set up a monthly donation and help a student ongoing!

Youth Education: Ivyn’s Story

Youth Education: Ivyn’s Story

Youth Education: Ivyn’s Story

Youth education is critical in Kenya, and in fact, they will tell you that education is everything. So, when we met Ivyn, a sweet 15 year old girl whose family was struggling to pay school fees, we knew that we had an opportunity to change her life, and the lives of her siblings, for the better. 

Ivyn’s parents were diagnosed as HIV positive, and a few years earlier, her mom had left her children and the community because of the stigma. Their father, an alcoholic, was not in a good place to take care of his children, so an uncle stepped in. At age 15, girls are considered adults, and eligible for marriage. That was what Ivyn was facing, although her desire was to finish school. 

As we stepped into the hut, the smell of smoke engulfed us. It was a round, open hut, and in poor condition. The thought of children living there was horrifying, but that is common across much of the rural and needy areas of Kenya. You can just imagine how a child would study, much less get the nutrition and support needed for an education. 

The Cost of School Fees

In Kenya, school fees can be incredibly challenging for families with a lot of children. They range from $10 per term to $50 per term for Primary School, plus supplies and uniforms. For Secondary School, it’s another story. Typically Secondary School is boarding school, so the costs jump to anywhere from $550 to $750 each year. For a family making less than $1/day…well, that’s easy math. It’s impossible. 

That is where 100 Humanitarians International comes in. We sponsor 27 students each year, both Primary and Secondary School, and fundraise for the school fees through our website, Facebook fundraisers, and expeditions. Our monthly donors contribute $25/month for school fees, and all combined, that can keep a child in school each year. We’ve had four graduates from our program, including Ivyn. 

Shortly after we started sponsoring Ivyn, her father passed away, and her mother moved home. We helped her grow gardens, donated a goat to help her with income and nutrition, and continued to support Ivyn. Sadly, Ivyn’s mother passed away last year, but she has the education and the ability to help provide school fees for her younger siblings. She is now their caregiver. 

You can see what the inside of Ivyn’s home looked like. It was dingy and full of soot and smoke. After her mom returned, the community helped build her a new home. In March 2018, we donated a goat to her family, and then in November 2020, our garden team built Ivyn Garden Tower Systems

The latest news, is that Ivyn is getting married! We are so excited for her new adventures, and have been told that she is very happy. 

100 Humanitarians International would love your help to provide school fees for students like Ivyn. As I mentioned, we have 27 students that we are supporting right now, and 6 of them are getting ready to graduate. If you would like to help, just donate below, or set up a monthly donation and help a student ongoing! 

Youth Education: Imani Orphan Care Foundation

Youth Education: Imani Orphan Care Foundation

Imani Orphan Care Foundation

We visited the Imani Orphan Care Foundation home to donate soccer balls and clothing to the home, and had a wonderful day touring the facility and playing with the kids. They had dormitories, kitchens, learning areas, and a small garden at the time. Kim Lee is the Founder Director, and has an amazing team in Kenya helping the children thrive. 

Orphanages in Kenya

In Kenya, the situation of Orphans and Vulnerable Children is a big challenge. Currently it is estimated that there are over three million Orphans in the country, with 47% orphaned as a result of HIV and AIDS and many more remain vulnerable due to several other factors.

Our team brought suitcases full of soccer balls and uniforms to donate to schools and communities for a few reasons. 1. Soccer is a huge sport in Kenya, loved by all kids. 2. The quality of the soccer balls in Kenya is very poor, and they fall apart easily. It was fun to not only donate, but also play soccer with the kids. 

You can see the difference between the new soccer ball that the middle child is holding, and the old soccer ball that the child on the right was holding. Big difference! 

We have donated 50+ soccer balls in Kenya. Playing soccer can also keep the boys focused when they are out of school so they stay out of trouble. 

100 Humanitarians International is looking for donations to help fund soccer clubs for youth in Kenya, to help them learn teamwork and stay focused on their goals. 

100 Humanitarians International hopes to fundraise $1000 each year to go to soccer balls and jerseys for boys in Kenya. If you would like to help contribute, or sponsor a club, donate below. We will also contribute soccer balls to Imani Orphan Care Foundation, to thank them for allowing us to visit and see their facilities. 100% of your donation goes to the equipment! 

Youth Education: Tenkes School

Youth Education: Tenkes School

Education is Everything in Kenya

Education is everything in Kenya, especially in rural communities like The Mau Forest. We visited Tenkes School in May 2016, where we worked with the students and teachers to build 20 desks, plant 75 trees, built a new kitchen to feed the students, and donated soccer balls to the kids. It was a beautiful day in the highlands of The Mau. 

5 Students Per Desk

With 300 students, a lot of desks are needed, and the kids at Tenkes School were sitting 5 students per desk. At our fundraiser, A Taste of Kenya, we were able to fundraise to build 20 new desks for the students, allowing them to spread out and learn better. The trees had to be cut down and the wood had to be planed in order to get the right sizes. It was quite the endeavor! Special thanks to Tenkes School for hosting us for the day and being so generous. 

The Mau Forest is losing trees, so to replace the trees we used for the desks and the kitchen, our team planted 75 new trees with the students. Trees bring water to The Mau Forest, and this area of Kenya has experienced drought over the decades. 

As I said, education is everything Kenya, and your contribution of $5 keeps 5 of our students in school for a day! We are currently sponsoring 27 students in Kenya from 8 different communities. 

100% of your donation goes to the school fees.

Meet Our Families: Mercy and Vincent

Meet Our Families: Mercy and Vincent

Meet our Families: Mercy and Vincent

The first time we met Vincent, we taught him how to brush his teeth with a toothbrush. We arrived in Bomet, Kenya during our second expedition with the intention of working with five families. Vincent’s was the fifth that we met on that trip. His mother, Mercy, was working in a field every day cutting vegetables. She made about $1 each day to feed her family.

We started Mercy’s family in our Business Box program, that included a cow, a goat, chickens, and gardens. Vincent was behind on school fees, so we fundraised for his education to get him back into school.

Mercy received all of the elements of the Business Box, and our Community Director, Anita, went to work training her on how to use milk from the cow and goat, and eggs from the chickens to feed their family as well as sell to make money. Our team visited Mercy’s family in November 2017. By then, she was learning to sew, and Vincent was starting his Senior year of high school.

By this time, as you can see, they were growing a garden. mercy had created a roadside stand to sell cut vegetables. She was working in the sewing center, and her friends reported that she had come out of a depression that she had been struggling with for a while.

One year later, when we were working in a rescue center for girls who have run from Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and early marriage, Mercy came to greet the girls. You could see a huge change in her, both countenance and physically. She had attended a training in Uganda with Days for Girls, and was working more in the sewing center in Bomet, helping make reusable feminine hygiene kits.

Vincent graduated from high school, and was also learning how to sew reusable feminine hygiene kits. Whenever our teams visited, he would be right there helping with any projects that we were doing in the community. When 100 Humanitarians International began a partnership with USANA Foundation to build Garden Tower Systems with families in Bomet, Vincent was our first choice to run the project.

He began working with families, and as of today, 30 families in Bomet have two garden towers, fencing, and a water storage tank. The families are eating the vegetables 5-8 meals a week average, and some families are able to sell vegetables to generate income.

With the money Vincent is paid to facilitate this project, he is building a house for himself. He’s learning how to track each family, document how many meals they are eating each week, and how much they are able to sell. From a family making $1/day four years ago, to a family able to pay their other children’s school fees, feed their family, make an income, and change a generation. We are so grateful for the stewardship they have shown, and the example they are setting to other families in the Bomet community about what is possible!

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100 Humanitarians International is a community of entrepreneurs and individuals around the world collaborating to create opportunities, both locally and internationally, for education and personal development.
We are committed to sustainable projects that support communities and preserve the culture of indigenous tribes.

The mission of 100 Humanitarians is “To mentor families globally through education and entrepreneurship in an effort to eliminate physical, mental, spiritual and emotional poverty, while preserving culture and tradition.”

100 Humanitarians International is recognized by the US Internal Revenue Service as a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. Contributions to 100 Humanitarians International are Tax Deductible under IRS regulations. 501(c)(3). Tax Exempt DLN # 26053581001597, EIN #82-1048388