Meet Our Families: Mercy and Vincent

Meet Our Families: Mercy and Vincent

Meet our Families: Mercy and Vincent

The first time we met Vincent, we taught him how to brush his teeth with a toothbrush. We arrived in Bomet, Kenya during our second expedition with the intention of working with five families. Vincent’s was the fifth that we met on that trip. His mother, Mercy, was working in a field every day cutting vegetables. She made about $1 each day to feed her family.

We started Mercy’s family in our Business Box program, that included a cow, a goat, chickens, and gardens. Vincent was behind on school fees, so we fundraised for his education to get him back into school.

Mercy received all of the elements of the Business Box, and our Community Director, Anita, went to work training her on how to use milk from the cow and goat, and eggs from the chickens to feed their family as well as sell to make money. Our team visited Mercy’s family in November 2017. By then, she was learning to sew, and Vincent was starting his Senior year of high school.

By this time, as you can see, they were growing a garden. mercy had created a roadside stand to sell cut vegetables. She was working in the sewing center, and her friends reported that she had come out of a depression that she had been struggling with for a while.

One year later, when we were working in a rescue center for girls who have run from Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and early marriage, Mercy came to greet the girls. You could see a huge change in her, both countenance and physically. She had attended a training in Uganda with Days for Girls, and was working more in the sewing center in Bomet, helping make reusable feminine hygiene kits.

Vincent graduated from high school, and was also learning how to sew reusable feminine hygiene kits. Whenever our teams visited, he would be right there helping with any projects that we were doing in the community. When 100 Humanitarians International began a partnership with USANA Foundation to build Garden Tower Systems with families in Bomet, Vincent was our first choice to run the project.

He began working with families, and as of today, 30 families in Bomet have two garden towers, fencing, and a water storage tank. The families are eating the vegetables 5-8 meals a week average, and some families are able to sell vegetables to generate income.

With the money Vincent is paid to facilitate this project, he is building a house for himself. He’s learning how to track each family, document how many meals they are eating each week, and how much they are able to sell. From a family making $1/day four years ago, to a family able to pay their other children’s school fees, feed their family, make an income, and change a generation. We are so grateful for the stewardship they have shown, and the example they are setting to other families in the Bomet community about what is possible!

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100 Humanitarians International is a community of entrepreneurs and individuals around the world collaborating to create opportunities, both locally and internationally, for education and personal development.
We are committed to sustainable projects that support communities and preserve the culture of indigenous tribes.

The mission of 100 Humanitarians is “To mentor families globally through education and entrepreneurship in an effort to eliminate physical, mental, spiritual and emotional poverty, while preserving culture and tradition.”

100 Humanitarians International is recognized by the US Internal Revenue Service as a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. Contributions to 100 Humanitarians International are Tax Deductible under IRS regulations. 501(c)(3). Tax Exempt DLN # 26053581001597, EIN #82-1048388

Events: Alex Boye and Lemarti Connection – Part 2

Events: Alex Boye and Lemarti Connection – Part 2

Alex Boye and Lemarti Connection – Part 2

The days went by, and we started planning a concert to be held on The Maasai Mara. I had become friends with Stephen Leken on Facebook, a very popular Maasai Gospel singer. We were also able to have another singer, Pastor Ben, whom we later began working with on projects in his community. Then, one day, Moses said, “I wonder if we could get Lemarti to perform.” Lemarti is a Samburu performer with a Bob Marley Reggae vibe, and we listen to his music a lot on our expeditions. It turned out that Lemarti was in the U.S. at the time, so Moses started chatting with him, and finally we came up with an agreement for him to perform at the concert. We were at a Mexican restaurant when it all came together. Suddenly, Moses got a very funny look on his face. He turned his phone around, and showed me the Alex Boye video “Circle of Life” featuring LEMARTI. What?! How was this happening?! But first, we had A Taste of Kenya to host, and the week of the event, Alex called me and we arranged to film Promised Land the day of the event. It would include shukas and a potbelly pig and walking around downtown Salt Lake City. Behind the scenes, it was hilarious watching people get all excited about the pig, and want to pet the pig, when there were two Africans in full shuka (the Maasai dress) standing there. I heard maybe one person say, “I think that’s Alex Boye.”

The best part of the day was ending up at A Taste of Kenya, and surprising the attendees with the news that they were going to be in an Alex Boye video that night! We had amazing performers at that event. Cactus Jack and Jenn Marco both performed, along with WOFA Afro Fusion. We wound up the night singing Karaoke and dancing and it was a really fun party. 

We also raised money for families in Kenya to receive cows and goats, in addition to school fees and reusable feminine hygiene kits!