Events: How to Run a Facebook Fundraiser

Events: How to Run a Facebook Fundraiser

How to Run a Facebook Fundraiser

 

We get asked often how to run a Facebook Fundraiser, because in the past year they have been very successful for us. We began our monthly $5 Friday Fundraisers in July 2018. Prior to that, we would have $5 Friday Fundraisers in our 100 Humanitarians International Facebook group, but because of analytics, it wouldn’t get seen very much. We were driving donations to our website and not right on Facebook. We launched our first $5 Friday Fundraiser with a goal to raise the funds for 300 Days for Girls reusable feminine hygiene kits. It was hugely successful, and we were able to fund the remaining kits we needed to donate to girls in Kenya for 2018. Our goal with our Facebook Fundraisers, is to also build our 100 Humanitarians International Facebook Group and Facebook Page.

1. Choose a Cause

When you choose a nonprofit to fundraise for on Facebook, 100% of your donation goes to that nonprofit. When you choose a specific person or project outside of a nonprofit, the fees are taken out. Funds are not sent until generally 45-70 days after your fundraiser ends, so be aware of that. This is not a fast way to fundraise, so plan a few months in advance if you can. We recommend organizations where at least 75% of your donation or more goes to projects and not to salaries.

2. Choose a Project

If you are choosing a nonprofit, try to determine where your fundraising efforts will go. Is it towards a project, is it administrative costs? People are more likely to donate, if it is to something specific. For example, when someone does a birthday fundraiser for 100 Humanitarians International on Facebook, I always ask them where they want the funds to go, once we receive them. We have four different areas that we fundraise for:

Women’s Initiatives – Days for Girls kits, underwear, HopeSaCs
Educational School Fees – 25 students
Business Boxes for Families – garden towers, chickens, goats, water filters, kitchen kits
Building Projects – training centers and the Emparnat Cultural Centre

3. Choose Pictures and Stories

Facebook has default pictures for fundraisers that have nothing to do with the nonprofit or cause you are raising funds for. We recommend gathering pictures and stories that you want to use, to help people understand why you are fundraising, what the cause means to you, and how you would like it to help. The more often you post during your fundraiser, the more likely it is to show up in the newsfeeds of the people you have invited to participate. We recommend that if you are going to host a fundraiser to make the commitment to post at least 3 times a week during the duration.

4. Choose the Length of Time

We have found that the best length of time for $250-500 fundraisers is about two weeks, and above that is around four weeks.

5. Thank Every Donor!

Facebook will notify you, as the host, when someone donates. You can go in and thank every single donor and personalize it. We also like to keep track of the people who have donated on a spreadsheet, so that we can contact them to show them where their money went, invite them to events and to go on expeditions, and to invite them to fundraisers in the future.

We hope this gives you some ideas! To see where our $5 Facebook Fundraiser donations go, and to get notified of new monthly fundraisers, join our Facebook Group! 

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Mentoring Families: A Tree Farm in Kenya

Mentoring Families: A Tree Farm in Kenya

A Tree Farm in Kenya

In the Fall of 2017, we visited Nkareta for the first time. Nkareta is a community of around 3000 people, just outside of Narok. Our goal at the time was to do family assessments, which we like to do when we “open” a new area. We met Jacob, who is now our Community Director in that area, and he introduced us to two families he wanted us to work with, the Peres and Kirimogos.

100 Humanitarians Community Director

Jacob, the Nkareta Community Director

We started off at the Peres’ house, and spent some time talking with the different members of the family. Noosonkon and Nkulena Pere have 6 children, ranging in age from Class 1 (first grade) to University age. They have 16 acres of land that they can rent for cattle grazing, and wanted to grow and sell vegetables. They have a local water hole that is really dirty, and when it dries up, they have to walk 4 km to get water.

100 Humanitarians - Pere Family

Meeting The Pere Family in Kenya

The Kirimogos, Ntabuat and Ksiuku, also have 6 children that attend the local public day school. They have 9 acres of land, no animals, and would like to grown and sell vegetables. They also have four adopted girls who are nieces that they help support.

Our assessment was that we should start with garden boxes for both families, and then move on to animals later. We launched a $5 Friday Fundraiser on Facebook to start building our gardening and tree projects in this community.

After returning from Kenya, we started discussions with Jacob about how to accomplish this. The McMurdos were living in Kenya at the time, and agreed to go and help the families build garden boxes. They were built in January 2018. At the same time, Jacob showed us the garden towers, which were cheaper than building the boxes, and wouldn’t be subject to termites. We decided that moving forward, we would use the towers, with plans to build the first one in June 2018. In the meantime, we also wanted to see about using some of the land that the Peres and Kirimogos had to start tree farms for seedlings that we could transplant to other families in the area. We started creating big plans for how we could help support the community in self-reliance skills. More on that, later!

100 Humanitarians Family Assessments

Becci and Christine visit The Peres

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Delivering Empowerment

Delivering Empowerment

On my first trip to Kenya, we delivered a cow to a family in the Suswa area. One of our team members, Kaci, went above and beyond with her fundraising for lady named Elizabeth. We brought the cow to the local pastor’s house. We call him “Pastor Ben.” He helped us find Elizabeth though our boots-on-the-ground guys, Moses and David. Pastor Ben lives in the same area as Elizabeth, so we thought we’d bring the cow to his house and walk it to Elizabeth’s place.

Elizabeth lives roughly a mile away from Pastor Ben. To the best of my recollection, there was maybe one other house between the pastor and her house. The path we took led us down bumpy dirt roads, recently harvested fields, and ditches. It couldn’t have been a nicer day. Perfect temperature, perfect cloud coverage (very little–blue skies, white puffy clouds dotting the sky) … but that all paled in comparison to the experience itself.

As we walked the cow to Elizabeth’s place, we talked, we laughed, we stumbled, we laughed again, and we had a blast. Here we were, a modge-podge group of crazy Americans and one guy from India, and merrily walked down this dusty dirt path. I’d guess we were maybe the equivalent of roughly 2 blocks from her house when we started hearing something not us. We all kind of stopped in our tracks, wondering what the sound was.

In the distance, we could see a group of people walking toward us. I can’t speak for the rest of the group, but I found myself stepping up my pace to find out who these people were. As we got closer, David and Moses told us that the group coming toward us were the villagers and friends of Elizabeth. See, over there, in Kenya, when there’s cause for a family to celebrate, the whole village celebrates. As we got closer and closer, the noise became much more distinct–so much so that David and Moses identified the song that they were singing FOR US. It was a song of gratitude, prayer, and praise to God for bringing Elizabeth this cow.

The whole point of this cow is to help empower Elizabeth to become more financially independent. No, she’s not going to build herself a mansion on the funds this cow brings in, but she can do a lot of things with this cow: use and/or sell milk, churn butter and possibly sell some, have calves that she can, in turn, sell or use for meat … this cow becomes a source of empowerment for her and her family. It will help put her children through school and possibly on to college!

I don’t care how big or burly you are. I don’t care what your testosterone level is. If that kind of scene does not move you to tears, you have no soul. As one of the photographers, I found it nearly impossible to  capture a good shot because my eyes were so blurred from tears cascading down my cheeks and soaking the dry, dusty road. My voice caught in my throat, a lump the size of lower Manhatten prevented me from breathing properly for a good few minutes as I drank in the entire scene.

It was in that moment that I realized that we weren’t really the ones changing lives; it was Kenya changing us–molding us to be better people, to show us a better way of living through giving thanks for all that we have had, currently have, and will ever have. It was so inspiring to walk with these people to their village, deliver the cow to Elizabeth, and drink chai tea with them.

Come with us. Your experiences will vary, but the emotions are the same.