The $5 Friday Fundraisers on Facebook

The $5 Friday Fundraisers on Facebook

What is a $5 Friday Fundraiser on Facebook?

$5 Friday Fundraisers on Facebook began back in July 2015 when we decided to start 100 Humanitarians International. We were able to fundraise for 25 desks for Tenkes School, and later we added a new kitchen to cook for 300 kids daily, because their mud kitchen had fallen down in a rainstorm. After that, we would just sporadically run a $5 Friday Fundraiser, until Facebook created the capability for us to do it on their platform. Game-changer! Suddenly we could reach more people, and since we are a non-profit, 100% of the fees were waived, therefore 100% of donations could go towards a project. Brilliant!

Our first Facebook $5 Friday Fundraiser was in July of 2018. We decided we wanted to raise the money to build 100 Garden Towers in Kenya for Families on our expeditions. The goal was $1000. Thanks to generous donations, we were able to fundraise $1300, allowing us to start a vegetable seedling garden to use for the garden towers. We will begin with 20 families on our Fall expedition! We got the idea last June from Jacob, our community director for Nkareta, and were able to build 8 garden towers. four were at a school in Nkareta, and then we planted two garden towers for two families that we have worked with over the past year.

We have also built raised garden beds with families, but have found these to be easier, more portable, and more cost effective. We can pile up the jeeps with bags and take them to multiple locations easily! We are really grateful for the ability to get more done and help more families with this innovation.

 

 

 

Our August $5 Friday Fundraiser was also unbelievably successful, and we were able to finish our commitment to provide 1000 reusable feminine hygiene kits to women and girls in Kenya. They were distributed to three schools in Nairobi, Nkareta, and Bomet, as well as women in the slums who were in the Kenyan news about not having access to sanitary pads.

We were able to raise $3000 in August for the Zariel Days for Girls Enterprise and Christine took kits to the street women featured in this news segment. On each expedition, our team takes kits to schools and rescue centers, providing 3 years of dignity for women and girls who don’t have access to the sanitary pads. Our commitment is 1000 kits per year, and ALL of the kits are made by the Zariel or Bomet Days for Girls Enterprises in Kenya, so that we keep the economy there, and also help families with self-reliance and economic development.

The Enterprises that we support, employ families to sew and distribute the kits, which allows those families to pay for food and school fees for their children. Along with the 25 children we support in school directly in Kenya, at least 12 additional students are supported in school because we fundraise here for the reusable femining hygiene kits, and allow the families in Kenya to make them. It keeps our focus on economic development and self-reliance in families.

Our goal for 2019 will be 1000 kits (or more) as well, so watch for that $5 Friday Fundraiser!

 

Our September $5 Friday Fundraiser was in partnership with HopeSaC International, which is run by Cindy Miller. Our goal was to raise the funds to take 20 HopeSaCs to Kenya on our Fall expedition to teach families how to cook with thermal cooking. We were able to reach our goal! We will also be working with the sewing centers in Kenya to teach them how to make and sell the HopeSaCs, saving time and fuel costs, and providing hot meals without spending hours cooking over a fire.

And finally, our October/November $5 Friday Fundraiser is for School Fees for 25 kids in Kenya. These kids come from families we are working with, and range in age from Kindergarten to Vincent, who is graduating this year after 3 years in our Youth Education Program. We met Vincent when he was a Sophomore, and have had the chance to support him in school and watch his family really thrive from it. Mercy, his mother who is in this video, was a recipient of our Business Box for Families, and now has a vegetable stand where she sells vegetables. We have had the opportunity to visit her twice this year, and her smile says it all. She is very happy.

If you would like to help contribute to the $5 Friday Fundraiser to raise the $6000 needed for school fees in 2019, click here!

 

 

 

Eselenkai Girls Primary Boarding School in Kenya

Eselenkai Girls Primary Boarding School in Kenya

Eselenkai Girls Primary Boarding School in Kenya

On our first expedition to Kenya, 100 Humanitarians held a Days for Girls workshop at Eselenkai Girls Primary Boarding School in Kenya. The girls in attendance were girls who had run from Female Genital Mutilation and early marriage, and were mostly in Class 7 and 8, which is 7th and 8th grades in the U.S. We had become aware of the issue of feminine hygiene for girls, and contacted the school to talk to them about the Days for Girls Enterprise and program that we were helping to create in Kenya. At the time, we were supporting one Days for Girls Enterprise, run by Christine Sakali, a woman that we helped fundraise for the previous year to attend the Days for Girls University in Uganda.

Eselenkai Primary School

After our training with Christine, we met with the girls in a large central hall. Part of the training included not just how to use the reusable feminine hygiene kit, but also hand washing and sanitation. Since then, our workshops have included things like self-defense and how to understand the female cycle. This was a very humbling experience for our team, because until we arrived at the school our expedition had mostly been the fun stuff like The Giraffe Centre and Elephant Orphanage in Nairobi. Realizing what these girls were facing, and how they were so brave to run towards a better life, we couldn’t help but experience a huge range of emotions.

 

 

Days for Girls in KenyaAs we distributed the kits, we had some time to spend with the girls, getting to know them and their stories. Many members of our team had the same names as the girls in the school. The girls, though in a very challenging situation, were all smiles and hugs and LOVED having their pictures taken with us. Each of us had a small group of girls swarming us, asking questions and playing with our hair. There aren’t the same physical boundaries in Kenya as there are in the U.S. and affection and love is everywhere. Even though we were the ones that showed up to serve them, all of us came away feeling like we were the ones who were served and taught by the girls.

Since then, we have made every effort to host a Days for Girls workshop on every expedition. We fundraise in the U.S. for kits, and then have Christine and her team sew the kits in Kenya. Her enterprise is able to then support many families with basic needs and school fees for their children. If you would like to donate to our Days for Girls program, click here. 

 

Kenya, Africa – Expedition #1 – Day One

Kenya, Africa – Expedition #1 – Day One

Flying to Kenya, Africa with 100 Humanitarians
Maasai Warriors Greet Us at the Airport
Kissing a giraffe at The Giraffe Centre

KARIBU KENYA, AFRICA – 100 Humanitarians International

After two trips to Kenya, Africa, I was ready to lead my first official expedition to Kenya. Turns out so many people wanted to go, that I stayed in Kenya for two back to back trips with 13 people in each group. It was crazy. I was crazy.

But let’s start at the beginning and tell the story.

Brittany was the first person to sign up for a trip, and quickly recruited a bunch of her friends to come along. I booked my flight a day early so that I could go with my daughter, and Brittany came along. It was so fun for us to get off the plane and have the Maasai warriors all to ourselves for a little while. We checked into our hotel, got a not so awesome night of rest, and then headed out the next day to visit the Giraffe Centre before the team arrived.

We not only visited The Giraffe Centre, we stopped by the Kazuri Bead Factory to see the women in action making the beads. It was a beautiful day, and Christine joined us on our adventures. We decided to visit The Galleria Mall for lunch, and then after a nap, headed to the airport where we met the rest of the team. Everyone arrived safely and ready to go. We were grateful that all of our bags made it as well, because the next day we had plans to drive to Narok for our first projects.

Our team was made up of 13 travelers – one kid and 12 adults. Our objective for the trip was to do a couple of Days for Girls workshops, visit families, build desks at a school, donate soccer balls to an orphanage, and go on safari!

This was the first trip to Kenya, Africa for everyone on the team, except me. In fact, a few people had gotten their passport for the very first time to go on this trip. No pressure! We were all excited for what was to come, most of all me. I had a hard time sleeping…

The Giraffe Centre – Expedition #1 – Day Two

The Giraffe Centre – Expedition #1 – Day Two

Flying to Kenya, Africa with 100 Humanitarians
Maasai Warriors Greet Us at the Airport
Kissing a giraffe at The Giraffe Centre

Kenya, Africa – The Giraffe Centre & The Elephant Orphanage

Kenya, Africa – We woke up after a decent night of sleep to a lovely breakfast at our hotel, followed by an excursion to The Elephant Orphanage and The Giraffe Centre in Nairobi. Every team loves to kiss a giraffe and pet a baby elephant. Both organizations are to protect the animals, and there is a lot to learn there. At The Giraffe Centre, the guards give you pellets to feed the giraffes. If you put one in your mouth, the giraffe will “kiss” you and grab it right from your lips.

The Elephant Orphanage is only open to watch the baby elephants feed for about an hour, but The Giraffe Centre is open all day, and has a fabulous gift shop.

Our drive to Narok was looming, and so were the clouds. We loaded up the jeeps and hit the road, with a stop at the Escarpment that overlooks The Great Rift Valley. The views are breathtaking, and after an hour in the jeep, it’s a great place to make a pit stop before heading down to the valley floor.

This particular team had Bob, or “Uncle Bob” as my daughter loved to call him. He was the “Manny” of the trip, and kept her supplied with orange fanta as a reward for trying out the latrine pits without freaking out. He kept the rest of us entertained with constant stories and jokes and songs. On the way, we stopped to try some grilled corn, or maize as it is called here.

Verdict: Not awesome.

We arrived at our hotel in Narok, and were greeted by friends who would be spending some time with us and helping us with projects over the next few days. After getting checked in and assigned to our rooms, we gathered in the restaurant and assembled 100 Days for Girls kits with underwear and soap in preparation for our workshop the next day at Tasaru Rescue Center.

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